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Okinawa RSS

Okinawa
Images in: /World War II/Pacific Theater /Okinawa

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6th Marine Division on Okinawa 6th Marine Division on Okinawa
A demolition crew from the 6th Marine Division watch dynamite charges explode and destroy a Japanese cave. Okinawa, May 1945. Robert M. Cusack. (Marine Corps)
 
 
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6th Marine Division using dynamite to seal cave 6th Marine Division using dynamite to seal cave
 Tenth Army commander General Simon Bolivar Buckner Jr. called the tactics used on Okinawa "corkscrew and blowtorch" for the press. Demolitions were the corkscrew and flamethrowers the blowtorch. This view shows a team from the 6th Marine Division using dynamite to seal a cave as the Marines approach the Shuri Line. The man closest to the camera has a SCR-300 "walkie-talkie" radio.  The flanks and rear of Sugar Loaf Hill were blanketed by fire from extensive cave and tunnel positions in Half Moon Hill to the southeast and the Horseshoe to the south. The 6th Division's analysis of the terrain pointed out that: ...the sharp depression included within the Horseshoe afforded mortar positions that were almost inaccessible to any arm short of direct, aimed rifle fire and hand grenades. Any attempt to capture Sugar Loaf by flanking action from east or west is immediately exposed to flat trajectory fire from both of the supporting terrain features. Between May 9-18, 1945, the 6th Marine Division suffered 2,662 combat casualties in reducing the Sugar Loaf complex. Japanese casualties were much higher; almost all were killed. Only five Japanese were taken prisoner in early May 1945.
 
 
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AAA gun emplacement with crew on Okinawa AAA gun emplacement with crew on Okinawa
View of #4 90mm AAA gun emplacement with crew in pit. "D" Battery, 98th AAA Gun Bn., 137th AAA Gp. Okinawa, July 18, 1945. Hendrickson. (Army)
 
 
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Battle-wrecked alligator tank, Okinawa Battle-wrecked alligator tank, Okinawa
On the flank of a battle-wrecked alligator tank the Okinawa sun casts the shadows of 6th Division Marines as they move into to mop up the southern tip of the island. 1945. Cpl. A. J. Giossi. (Marine Corps)
 
 
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Corsair fires on Japanese stronghold, Okinawa Corsair fires on Japanese stronghold, Okinawa
Corsair fighter plane fires rocket projectiles on a run against a Japanese stronghold on Okinawa. In the lower background is the smoke of battle as Marine units move in to follow up with a Sunday punch. June 1945. Lt. David D. Duncan. (Marine Corps)
 
 
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General Lemuel Shepherd of the 6th Marine Division General Lemuel Shepherd of the 6th Marine Division
With the captured capital of Naha as a background, Marine Maj. Gen. Lemuel Shepherd, commanding general of the 6th Marine Division, relaxes on an Okinawan ridge long enough to consult a map of the terrain. June 1945. Pfc. Sam Weiner. (Marine Corps)
 
 
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Gunners working Barbette gun on USS New Jersey, Okinawa Gunners working Barbette gun on USS New Jersey, Okinawa
Gunners packing in bags of powder which will fire the huge shell already in the 16" Barbette gun, on board the U.S.S. New Jersey (BB-62), North of Okinawa, April 7, 1945.
 
 
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Japanese night attack "Hell's Belles" squadron, Okinawa Japanese night attack "Hell's Belles" squadron, Okinawa
Japanese night raiders are greeted with anti-aircraft fire by the Marine defenders at Yontan airfield, Okinawa. In the foreground are Marine Corsair fighter planes of the "Hell's Belles" squadron, 316th Fighter Squadron, Jan 20, 1945. T.Sgt. Chorlest. (Marine Corps)
 
 
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LCT's and LSM's unload supplies on Okinawa LCT's and LSM's unload supplies on Okinawa
 From left to right: LCT-1415, LCT-1179, LCT-1265, LCT-1049 are landing supplies on Yellow Beach near the mouth of the Bishi Gawa (River) while LSM-220 and LST-1000 are maneuvering behind them, note 55-gallon drum dump ashore and vehicles unloading. The fleet is out to sea beyond the coral reef that prevented cargo and assault ships from getting in any closer. LCVPs (Higgins Boats) and other craft carry supplies to the beaches while the LCTs, LSMs and LSTs could land right on the beach at high tide after seabees enlarged the beach exit, Hagushi, Okinawa.  On April 1, 1945, L-Day for Okinawa, LSM-220 grounded on the reef on Blue Beach twice attempting to land tanks, both times the water was too deep. LSM-220 finally delivered her tanks to Yellow Beach 2. Pontoon causeways out to the reef were built and natural sandbars enlarged so that unloading operations could continue at low tide and LCTs could unload on the beach. Despite the deep water and lack of suitable grounding space, eventually more cargo was unloaded at the Hagushi beaches in a shorter period of time than any other Pacific amphibious invasion. The LCTs and the LST in the photo were scrapped after the war; LSM-220 served as a commercial transport, supplying NASA's operations in Florida, until she was sunk in storm off the Bahamas in 1970.
 
 
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LSM's firing rockets off Tokashiki Island LSM's firing rockets off Tokashiki Island
 LSM(R)-196 LSM(R)-190 and LSM(R)-199 firing rockets off Tokashiki Island in Kerama-retto, Okinawa, in support of the landing of the 306th Regiment of the 77th Infantry Division. The island was declared secure on March 29, 1945; Japanese continued to hold out until the end of the war. The US Navy adapted the Landing Ship Medium as a gunboat/rocketship in 1944.  Built at Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina, the LSM(R)'s carried one 5-inch (127 millimeter) dual-pupose gun, two 40mm Bofors and three 20mm oerlikon antiaircraft guns, and 75 5-inch four-rail Mark 36 (capable of variable elevation) and 30 5-inch six-rail Mark 30 (fixed at 45 degrees) rocket launchers that could fire either spin-stabilized or fin-stabilized rockets. The warheads were usually modified 5-inch/38 caliber artillery shells with 8.6 pounds (3.9 kilograms) of trinitrotoluene (TNT).  The entire complement of 380 rockets could be fired in under one minute to a range of 10,000 yards (9.1 kilometers). After supporting amphibious landings in Kerama and Okinawa with rocket barrages, LSMs were detailed to provide additional antiaircraft support to radar picket ships protecting the invasion fleet from kamikaze attacks. LSM(R)-190 was sunk by a kamikaze on May 4, 1945 while on picket duty.
 
 
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Marine gets haircut, Okinawa Marine gets haircut, Okinawa
 With their M1 155mm howitzer behind them, Private First Class Troy Dixon, Leadhill, Arkansas, uses a Japanese barber chair to cut the hair of Sergeant John Anderson, Anita, Pennsylvania. Both men are from the 363rd Field Artillery Battalion, 96th Infantry Division, XXIV Corps, Tenth Army.  War weary from days of heavy combat operations, the 363rd Field Artillery Battalion left Buckner Bay, Okinawa on July 27, 1945  on Coast Guard-manned LST-832 for Mindoro, Philippine Islands for rest and relaxation. Shuri, Okinawa, June 10, 1945. Photo by Hendrickson, U.S. Army.
 
 
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Marine moves into "Death Valley" Okinawa Marine moves into "Death Valley" Okinawa
A Marine dashes through Japanese machine gun fire while crossing a draw called "Death Valley" by the men fighting there. Marines sustained more than 125 casualties in eight hours crossing this valley on Okinawa, May 10, 1945. Pvt. Bob Bailey. (Marine Corps)
 
 
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Marine rifleman in Okinawa cave Marine rifleman in Okinawa cave
Silhouetted against the entrance to one of the caves in the Okinawa hills, a Marine rifleman resorts to special tactics to pick off enemy snipers in the surrounding ridges. Ca. June 1945. Cpl. F. E. Kershaw. (Marine Corps)
 
 
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Marines fire at Japanese positions, Okinawa Marines fire at Japanese positions, Okinawa
Marines fire at Japanese positions in Southern Okinawa begins the early morning hours of May 11, 1945 as an all out offensive gets underway. Cpl. Eastman. (Marine Corps)
 
 
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Marines pass through village on Okinawa Marines pass through village on Okinawa
Marines pass through a small village where Japanese soldiers lay dead. Okinawa, April 1945. Norris G. McElroy. (Marine Corps)
 
 
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Marines transport 500lbs bombs to aircraft Marines transport 500lbs bombs to aircraft
Marines transport 500lbs bombs to aircraft at advanced Pacific base. Ca. 1944.
 
 
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Pilots in briefing room USS Essex Pilots in briefing room USS Essex
 Pilots being briefed on board the USS Essex, night before the raid on Okinawa, January 1945. Photo by Ens. Thomas Binford, US Navy.
 
 
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Rockets being loaded under wing of F4U, Okinawa Rockets being loaded under wing of F4U, Okinawa
Five-inch rockets being loaded under the wing of an F4U of MAG-33 just before take-off. The safety pins are removed and the rockets are ready for charging at airbase on Okinawa, June 1945. Lt. David D. Duncan. (Marine Corps)
 
 
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Tank under water on Okinawa Tank under water on Okinawa
A tank sunk in 5 feet of water waits for towing equipment. The Tank Commander gives vent to his feelings with a string of unprintable phraseology while his driver uses a helmet to bale out the interior on Okinawa, May 1945.
 
 
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Tank-borne infantry of 29th Marines, Okinawa Tank-borne infantry of 29th Marines, Okinawa
Tank-borne infantry moving up to take the town of Ghuta before the Japanese can occupy it. The men are members of the 29th Marines on Okinawa, April 1, 1945. Pfc. Robert L. Keller. (Marine Corps)
 
 
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Transfer wounded men off USS Bunker Hill Transfer wounded men off USS Bunker Hill
Transfer of wounded men from USS Bunker Hill to USS Wilkes Barre, who were injured during fire aboard carrier following Japanese suicide dive bombing attack off Okinawa in Ryukyus. May 11, 1945. PhoM3c. Kenneth E. Roberts. (Navy)
 
 
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USS Bunker Hill burning, Kamikaze attacks USS Bunker Hill burning, Kamikaze attacks
USS Bunker Hill burning after Japanese kamikaze attacks near Okinawa, May 11, 1945.
 
 
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USS Bunker Hill hit by Kamikazes USS Bunker Hill hit by Kamikazes
 USS Bunker Hill hit by two Kamikazes in 30 seconds off Kyushu. On the morning of 11 May 1945, while supporting the Okinawa invasion, Bunker Hill was hit and severely damaged by two Kamikazes.
 
 
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Wounded Marine carried off tank, Okinawa Wounded Marine carried off tank, Okinawa
Pvt. W. D. Fuhlrodt is removed from the tank which carried him from the front lines. Japanese artillery and small arms fire made it impossible for ambulances to carry the wounded to the rear on Okinawa, 1945. Sgt. Thomas D. Barnett, Jr. (Marine Corps )
 
 
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Wounded Marine from the Battle of Okinawa Wounded Marine from the Battle of Okinawa
U.S. Marine receives help from his wounds from the "Battle of Okinawa" on board U.S.S. Soiace enroute to Guam. May 1945. Lt. Victor Jorgensen. (Navy)
 
 
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