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Mulberry Harbour RSS

Mulberry Harbour
Images in: /World War II/D-Day/Mulberry Harbour

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1st LST to unload troops and tanks 1st LST to unload troops and tanks
LST 543 is the 1st LST to unload troops and tanks on Mulberry "A" Omaha Beach.
 
 
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47mm Bofors gun on top of Phoenix B90 47mm Bofors gun on top of Phoenix B90
American unloading in Normandy at Omaha Beach. Each Phoenix was equipped with AA 47mm Bofors gun on top.
 
 
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612th Tank Battalion unloading on Mulberry "A" Omaha Beach 612th Tank Battalion unloading on Mulberry "A" Omaha Beach
Halftrack with 612th Tank Destroyer Battalion assigned to 2nd Infantry Division, unloading on Mulberry "A" Omaha Beach. In the background you can see the two Lobnitz quays laid out in "T" with five tug boats on the right, June 16, 1944.
 
 
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DUKW moves along Mulberry floating road DUKW moves along Mulberry floating road
Mulberry "A" floating road, codename "Whales" near the center of pier, a DUKW moves along the road heading to Omaha Beach,  June 16, 1944.
 
 
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Entrance to Mulberry "A" Omaha Beach Entrance to Mulberry "A" Omaha Beach
Entrance of Mulberry "A" Omaha Beach, the Mulberry harbour assembled on Omaha beach at Saint-Laurent-sur-Mer for use the American liberation forces. The tug boats on top left are with Army Transportation Service assigned with the towing for Mulberry's, on the left is the ST-770 docked on the Mulberry.
 
 
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Entrance to Mulberry "A" Omaha Beach Entrance to Mulberry "A" Omaha Beach
 Entrance ramps at Mulberry "A" Omaha Beach. The pier heads or landing wharves at which ships were unloaded. Each of these consisted of a pontoon with four legs that rested on the sea bed to anchor the pontoon, yet allowed it to float up and down freely with the tide.
 
 
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Exit of Mulberry harbour on Omaha beach Exit of Mulberry harbour on Omaha beach
The exit of Mulberry harbour on Omaha beach, in the foreground, hedgehogs from the German defensive system that the US Engineers have cleared out. The footbridge known as Eastern Pier is still unfinished, before the storm on June 18, 1944. Mulberry harbour was constructed out of 600,000 tons of concrete between 33 jetties, and had 10 miles (15 km) of floating roadways to land men and vehicles on the beach.
 
 
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First LST to arrive at Mulberry "A" First LST to arrive at Mulberry "A"
First LST to arrive at Mulberry "A", LST 543 is to unload tanks and troops to Omaha Beach, June 16, 1944.
 
 
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First LST to dock at artificial harbour First LST to dock at artificial harbour
The LST-543 is the first LST to dock at the artificial harbour Mulberry "A", to unload troops and tanks on Omaha Beach June 16, 1944.
 
 
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Gooseberry 2 at Omaha Beach Gooseberry 2 at Omaha Beach
Gooseberry 2 at Omaha Beach, in perforated between Liberty Ships SS Artemas Ward (N°578) and the SS James W Marshall (N°552) one sees on the slope of rollers the LCI-92, in the immediate west of the Mills at Saint Laurent sur Mer, destroyed on June 6, 1944. Mulberry A.
 
 
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Gooseberry 2 at Omaha Beach, D-Day+2 Gooseberry 2 at Omaha Beach, D-Day+2
Gooseberry 2 at Omaha Beach area, Mulberry was the code name for the artificial harbours. These were the "Gooseberries" which metamorphosed into fully fledged harbours. There were two harbours, Mulberry 'A' and Mulberry 'B'. The 'Mulberry' harbours consisted of a floating outer breakwater called "Bombardons", floating piers named "Whale" and the pier heads code named "Spuds".
 
 
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Gooseberry at Omaha Beach Gooseberry at Omaha Beach
Gooseberry at Omaha Beach, numbers of corncobs are visible on the right. The sheltered waters created by the Corn Cob block ships. Two of the "Gooseberries" form into "Mulberries",  artificial harbours.
 
 
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Landing wharves "Spud piers" Mulberry "A" Landing wharves "Spud piers" Mulberry "A"
Landing wharves "Spud piers" at Mulberry A, Omaha Beach. The Mulberry harbour was a type of temporary harbour developed in World War II to offload cargo and troops on the beaches during the Allied invasion of Normandy.
 
 
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LST 543 is the first LST to unload DUKW LST 543 is the first LST to unload DUKW
The LST 543 opens its doors and begins unloading troops, tanks and vehicles. LST 543 is the first LST to unload on the floating port at Mulberry A. The vehicle is an amphibious truck DUKW called "duck". June 16, 1944.
 
 
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LST 543 opens doors to unload tanks LST 543 opens doors to unload tanks
LST 543 opens doors to unload tanks on Omaha beach, June 16, 1944.
 
 
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Mulberry Harbour "A" at Omaha Beach Mulberry Harbour "A" at Omaha Beach
The Mulberry Harbour’s purpose was to ease and speed up the unloading process so that Allied troops were supplied as they advanced across France after breaking out from Normandy. The success of D-Day could only be maintained if the advancing troops were supplied and more men landed. The Mulberry Harbour was one of the greatest engineering feats of World War Two. The Mulberry Harbour was actually two artificial harbours, which were towed across the English Channel and put together off the coast of Normandy. One, known as Mulberry A, was constructed at Omaha Beach and the other, known as Mulberry B (though nicknamed ‘Port Winston’), was constructed off Arromanches at Gold Beach.
 
 
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Platform from artificial harbour Mulberry 'A' Platform from artificial harbour Mulberry 'A'
On board a platform of the artificial harbour at "Omaha Beach" By June 9, just 3 days after D-Day. The two harbours codenamed Mulberry 'A' and 'B' were constructed at Omaha Beach and Arromanches. A complete Mulberry harbour was constructed out of 600,000 tons of concrete between 33 jetties, and had 10 miles (15 km) of floating roadways to land men and vehicles on the beach.
 
 
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Row of Phoenixes for Mulberry A, Omaha Beach Row of Phoenixes for Mulberry A, Omaha Beach
Long row of Phoenixes for the principal protection of Mulberry A, in front of Omaha Beach. The Mulberry harbours were two prefabricated or artificial military harbours, which were taken across the English Channel from Britain with the invading army in sections and assembled off the coast of Normandy as part of the D-Day invasion of France, June 8, 1944.
 
 
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Senior officers from the navy at "Mulberry A" Senior officers from the navy at "Mulberry A"
Senior officers from the Navy, in front "Gooseberries". American Admirals Clark and Kirk aboard Destroyer HMS Scorpion oversee the operation on June 14, 1944 Mulberry A at Omaha Beach. Admiral Clark "right"right holds in hand the plan of Mulberry A.
 
 
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Tanks and vehicles unload and head to Omaha beach Tanks and vehicles unload and head to Omaha beach
The artificial harbour of Mulberry A (Omaha Beach)  before the storm. Long line of tanks and vehicles unloading from the 612th Tank Destroyer Bn with 2nd Infantry Division, and head to Omaha beach. Tractors, Cargo liner and cases of wood are on platform for the beach.
 
 
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Trucks and tanks move along road, Omaha Beach Trucks and tanks move along road, Omaha Beach
Trucks and tanks move along the road heading to Omaha Beach. Mulberry "A" floating road, code "Whales" near the center of pier, A panel comprising N° of each element constituting the Mulberry, and a road sign "Load Limit 25 Ton" June 16, 1944.
 
 
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Tug boats arrive with a "Phoenix" Tug boats arrive with a "Phoenix"
Two boxes code name "Phoenix" for "Mulberry A" at Omaha Beach In the foreground two tug boats arrive on site with a Phoenix
 
 
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Tug boats move "Phoenix" B82 to Mulberry A Tug boats move "Phoenix" B82 to Mulberry A
Tug boats move the "Phoenix" to port, Mulberry A, in front of Omaha Beach. Each Phoenix was equipped with a station of DCA, on top of the Phoenix you can see a Swedish 40mm Bofors gun, used against air attack. A Mulberry harbour was a type of temporary harbour developed in World War II to offload cargo on the beaches during the Allied invasion of Normandy.
 
 
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Tug boats move "Phoenix" B82 to Omaha Beach Tug boats move "Phoenix" B82 to Omaha Beach
Tug boats move the "Phoenix"  in front of Omaha Beach. Each Phoenix was equipped with a station of DCA, on top of the Phoenix you can see a Swedish 40mm Bofors gun, used against air attack, June 7, 1944. By June 9, 1944, just 3 days after D-Day,  two harbours named Mulberry 'A' and 'B' were constructed at Omaha Beach and Arromanches.
 
 
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Tug boats move "Phoenix" to Mulberry A Tug boats move "Phoenix" to Mulberry A
Tug boats move the "Phoenix"  intended protection against the sea for the port, Mulberry A, in front of Omaha Beach. Each Phoenix was equipped with a station of DCA, on top of the Phoenix, a Swedish 40mm Bofors gun, used against air attack. The Mulberry harbours were two prefabricated or artificial military harbours, which were taken across the English Channel from Britain with the invading army in sections and assembled off the coast of Normandy as part of the D-Day invasion of France.
 
 
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Unloading area Mulberry "A" Omaha Beach Unloading area Mulberry "A" Omaha Beach
Unloading area at Mulberry "A"  the starboard side has special footbridge installed on Lobnitz located on the left (in the west) from the artificial beach. The Mulberry harbour assembled on Omaha beach at Saint-Laurent-sur-Mer, The LST-543 on the right is docked.
 
 
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